About Ohio Student Association

Formed in 2012, Ohio Student Association (OSA) is a statewide organization led by young people. OSA engages in values-based issue & electoral organizing, nonviolent direct action, advocacy for progressive public policy, and leadership development. On campuses and communities across Ohio, we organize young people to build independent political power.

We are young people breaking cultural, economic and political chains by collectively swinging back against systems of oppression. We do this through grassroots organizing, direct action, and leadership development. We are a vehicle for people who believe another world is possible.

  • Latest from the blog

    #Occupy4Tamir at Prosecutor McGuinty's Home

    Occupy4Tamir.jpgOSA joined with Tamir Rice's cousin and hundreds of Cleveland community activists on Saturday to demand justice for the 12 eyar old child who was killed by police at a recreation center in his neighborhood. A symbolic funeral was held at a park in West Cleveland and the group marched through the streets of West Park to the home of Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Timothy McGuinty to demand action be taken to hold police accountable. In spite of white nationalist groups attempts to intimidate protestors, people of all races, ages, sexualities, genders and faiths gathered to demand that McGuinty do more to make sure that police cannot kill with impunity. 

    This action took place just hours after the Brelo Verdict was read, finding the officer who stood on the hood of the car and unloaded his weapon into the car where an unarmed Black couple sat. In total, 137 shots were fired by dozens of police officers into the car of Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams.

    There is a fundamental flaw in the criminal justice system, when prosecutors have no accountability when they fail to prosecute to the fullest extent of the law. Prosecutors such as McGuinty rely on police officers to win cases every single day, and so often fail to put forth a winning case against police officers in situations of police brutality. 

    The efforts of our current Governor Kasich and Attorney General Mike Dewine are superficial bandaids to this structural conflict of interest. This is why we need a fundamental shift in the power relationship between community and police in Ohio. 

    Watch OSA leaders speak on this action and this injustice on Democracy Now and CNN.

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    Ohio Students are "Drowning in Debt"

    blogimage.jpgReposted from a Wednesday May 20, 2015 Article in The Columbus Dispatch By Catherine Candisky

    OSA organizer Rachael Collyer graduated summa cum laude from Ohio State University this month, but the celebration has been subdued as she contemplates how to repay $28,000 in student loans.

    On Wednesday, she wore swimming goggles and arm floaties before a subcommittee of the Ohio Senate to emphasize that she’s drowning in debt and fretting about her future.

    “It is incredibly frustrating that despite doing everything I was told I needed to do to be successful, I now find myself in overwhelming debt,” said Collyer, a Cleveland Heights native and representative of the Ohio Student Association.

    She was among a dozen students from colleges and universities across the state who urged the Senate Finance Committee’s higher-education subcommittee to boost funding to schools and increase financial aid to students as the legislators work on the upcoming two-year budget.

    Subcommittee Chairman Randy Gardner, R-Bowling Green, said on Wednesday that he expects the Senate to increase state aid to colleges and universities, but details have not been decided.

    “Ohio leads the nation in tuition restraint, but clearly more needs to be done,” he said.

    Student-loan debt in the U.S. reached $1.2 trillion by the end of 2014. In Ohio, those graduating with bachelor’s degrees from state schools last year averaged about $30,000 in student debt.

    “The weight of my accumulated debt weighs on me and leaves me fearful of the future,” said Alli Rigel, a recent Ohio State graduate trying to pay for medical school.

    Tobi Akomolede, Senate speaker in the undergraduate student government at the University of Cincinnati, said a provision in the House-passed budget prohibiting tuition hikes in 2017 would help keep college affordable and restrict student debt, but more must be done.

    “Increased state funding is crucial to prevent costs from coming back to students in the form of lower-quality education, gutted student-support services, stunted innovation and lack of cost-saving services,” Akomolede said.

    Although tuition at Ohio’s four-year universities has decreased by an inflation-adjusted 2.4 percent in the past decade, the state’s annual per-student aid is $2,237 below the U.S. average.

    A new report shows that most states, including Ohio, are spending less per student on higher education this school year than they did in 2007-08, the start of the recession.

    Ohio has cut spending by 22 percent, according to the analysis released last week by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a progressive research group that analyzes state and federal spending. Overall, all but three states — Alaska, North Dakota and Wyoming — have reduced aid to colleges and universities. Of those that cut spending, 31 have done so by more than 20 percent.

    The report says less state aid means higher tuition for students and their families, pushing student-loan debt to record highs, surpassing both car loans and credit-card debt. About 60 percent of college students graduate with debt.

    The House-passed budget includes 2 percent annual increases in higher-education funding. It also includes $7.5 million to help pay off the college debt of students with in-demand jobs who promise to stay in Ohio for five years.

    In addition to providing more state aid to colleges and universities, the Senate might approve increased funding for need-based Ohio College Opportunity Grants, Gardner said. Several students testified that the grants helped them earn degrees without accumulating debt.

    Gardner said other moves that would help are getting more high-schoolers to earn college credits through tuition-free early-college programs and renewing efforts to graduate more students in four years.

    ccandisky@dispatch.com

    @ccandisky

     

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    Student Victory Against Ohio Poll Tax!

    amelia2.jpgThe students who stood up to Ohio legislators' voter suppression tactics aimed at disenfranchising out of state college students could not be ignored. 

    Amelia Hayes of Ohio Student Association joined Senator Nina Turner on an Ed Show interview on MSNBC last week to speak out against this provision snuck into a transportation bill.  

    Governor John Kasich used his line-item veto authority today to kill language that would have required out-of-state college students who register to vote in Ohio to obtain in-state licenses and vehicle registrations within 30 days. 

    According to the Columbus Dispatch, the governor let stand a new portion of the law requiring new residents to get an updated license and registration within 30 days. But he stripped out the measure linking that provision with voting registration. 

    Ohio Student Association has advocated for expanding voting access, not limiting it. We want to see initiatives that exist in other places to enhance our democracy and support voting like automatic voter registration, online voter registration options and same day voter registration.

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  • Upcoming events

    Saturday, July 11, 2015 at 11:00 AM

    Take Back Our Schools? Action at the Ohio Department of Education Office

    Columbus, OH- On Wednesday, July 15, at 11:00am, The Ohio Student Association (OSA) and the University District Freedom School (UDFS) will lead a march of Ohio students, parents, and allies from the Ohio Statehouse to the Ohio Department of Education , where they will share a list of demands regarding the abolition of zero-tolerance and school push out policies. Together, these groups are driving efforts to create a fundamental shift in the relationship between our students and public schools’ disciplinary procedures.

    The Columbus action is part of OSA’s continued efforts to demand justice for young Ohioans and force law enforcement and policymakers to address the structural and systematic racial injustices faced by students of color in low-income communities.

    We are taking this fight to the Department of Education office because we cannot allow state laws and policies to embolden the school-to-prison pipeline.

    Background:

    In May of last year, almost 100 community leaders and allies marched rallied downtown to support two pieces of state legislation calling for the abolition of zero-tolerance policies in Ohio public schools.  Since then, three almost identical bills have been introduced to the Senate, yet none of been passed.

    Ohio schools issued more than 210,000 out of school suspensions in the 2012-13 school year, and more than 3,400 expulsions.  The majority of the suspensions (54%) were for “disobedient or disruptive” (non-violent) behavior. Black students and students with disabilities are more likely to be subjected to suspensions and expulsions, with Black students making up 16% of student enrollment, but 52% of suspensions and 53% of expulsions and students with disabilities making up 15% of enrollment, but 27.5% of suspensions.

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